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Seeing Lights

An interview with Zach Harmon, RCS c/o 2014

One of the RCS goals to #CelebrateRCS in or 50th anniversary is to connect with RCS Alumni and see what God has been doing in their lives since high school graduation.  Dr. Hearne recently interviewed RCS Alumni Zachary Harmon, class of 2014 who has now crossed two oceans, spent countless hours at sea, and most recently delivered fuel to places all over the Bering & Arctic seas.

As part of the interview, Dr. Hearne asked Zach to share his thoughts on this month’s theme verse, Matthew 5:16, “You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.”

Zach shared, “I spend a lot of time looking for lights–lights on stands, lights on hills, lights on boats, all sorts of lights. On a ship at night, lights are the easiest way to figure out where you are, whom you’re looking at and where everyone is going. When Jesus is telling us that we are the light of the world, He is organizing us into the greatest network of navigational beacons in history! Not only should we serve as a guide to non-believers, we are an easily identifiable lighthouse to each other. As I travel the world, it doesn’t matter if I’m in Olongapo, Savoonga, or Searsport, As long as I can spot these lights, I know I can find support and fellowship, and that’s a really comforting fact as you go about your day. ”

 

When did you begin attending RCS and what year did you graduate?

I attended Redwood K-12, graduating in 2014.

 

Who were your favorite RCS Teachers?

Looking back, I realize I had an excellent team of teachers and I am grateful for each and everyone one of them.  I had to pick one, I’d have to pick Mr McDaniel.

 

What activities did you participate in while a student?

I was active in the student Government, as well as played Varsity Volleyball for four years.

 

As a student what did you love about RCS?

I always loved the small school vibes, more or less. I feel like I knew everyone in the Freshman, Sophomore and Junior class during my Senior year.

 

What did you do after graduating from RCS?

I attended the California State University Maritime Academy. In my four years there, I crossed the Atlantic and Pacific, and graduated with a USCG Third Mate Unlimited License (which is a professional maritime certification/license. A Third Mate is a licensed officer in the deck department of a merchant ship. The third mate is an OICNW watchstander and customarily the ship’s safety officer. Other duties vary depending on the type of ship, its crewing, and other factors).

 

What are you currently doing?

In November I got home from a six-month hitch in western Alaska delivering fuel to villages and facilities all over the Bering Sea and the Arctic. I made it as far north as Barrow, and as far west as Shemia and Atttu, the end of the Aleutian chain. I’m on vacation for 6 months till the ice melts, or until I get bored and look for another job.



Seeing Lights

An interview with Zach Harmon, RCS c/o 2014

One of the RCS goals to #CelebrateRCS in or 50th anniversary is to connect with RCS Alumni and see what God has been doing in their lives since high school graduation.  Dr. Hearne recently interviewed RCS Alumni Zachary Harmon, class of 2014 who has now crossed two oceans, spent countless hours at sea, and most recently delivered fuel to places all over the Bering & Arctic seas.

As part of the interview, Dr. Hearne asked Zach to share his thoughts on this month’s theme verse, Matthew 5:16, “You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.”

Zach shared, “I spend a lot of time looking for lights–lights on stands, lights on hills, lights on boats, all sorts of lights. On a ship at night, lights are the easiest way to figure out where you are, whom you’re looking at and where everyone is going. When Jesus is telling us that we are the light of the world, He is organizing us into the greatest network of navigational beacons in history! Not only should we serve as a guide to non-believers, we are an easily identifiable lighthouse to each other. As I travel the world, it doesn’t matter if I’m in Olongapo, Savoonga, or Searsport, As long as I can spot these lights, I know I can find support and fellowship, and that’s a really comforting fact as you go about your day. ”

 

When did you begin attending RCS and what year did you graduate?

I attended Redwood K-12, graduating in 2014.

 

Who were your favorite RCS Teachers?

Looking back, I realize I had an excellent team of teachers and I am grateful for each and everyone one of them.  I had to pick one, I’d have to pick Mr McDaniel.

 

What activities did you participate in while a student?

I was active in the student Government, as well as played Varsity Volleyball for four years.

 

As a student what did you love about RCS?

I always loved the small school vibes, more or less. I feel like I knew everyone in the Freshman, Sophomore and Junior class during my Senior year.

 

What did you do after graduating from RCS?

I attended the California State University Maritime Academy. In my four years there, I crossed the Atlantic and Pacific, and graduated with a USCG Third Mate Unlimited License (which is a professional maritime certification/license. A Third Mate is a licensed officer in the deck department of a merchant ship. The third mate is an OICNW watchstander and customarily the ship’s safety officer. Other duties vary depending on the type of ship, its crewing, and other factors).

 

What are you currently doing?

In November I got home from a six-month hitch in western Alaska delivering fuel to villages and facilities all over the Bering Sea and the Arctic. I made it as far north as Barrow, and as far west as Shemia and Atttu, the end of the Aleutian chain. I’m on vacation for 6 months till the ice melts, or until I get bored and look for another job.